Do Americans Care About Password Security? [Infographic]

Rob Sobers

Rob SobersSenior Director at Varonis

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Cyber attacks are top-of-mind concern for businesses, both large and small. In 2017, security breaches proliferated the news cycle, highlighting how at risk companies are for hacks, and just how damaging they can be.

Infographic

While splashy headlines typically focus on large-scale hacks caused by rogue hackers or foreign entities, there are less flashy — but more common — causes of security leaks that businesses need to worry about. Weak passwords, for example, are among common mistakes that lead to business security breaches.

This is perhaps unsurprising when you consider the recent results from a password security study conducted by Varonis. The study, which surveyed 1,000 Americans, found that the majority of people aren’t following password best practices in their own digital lives. For example, the study found that 57 percent of Americans rely on memorization to keep track of their passwords, which is counterintuitive to creating complex, varied logins; in contrast, only 7 percent of people use password management software, which is the most recommended management method by cybersecurity professionals.

These poor digital practices, when carried over into an organization, can spell disaster for cybersecurity. Companies must implement strong password policies — from requiring employees to create strong, complex passwords to encouraging the use of password management software and two-factor authentication — to ensure the safety of their data.

To learn more about the password habits of Americans, check out the infographic from Varonis, below. Is it time your company get serious about password security?

Do Americans Care About Password Security? [Infographic]

Author: Rob Sobers is a Senior Director at cybersecurity firm Varonis. He has been writing and designing software for over 20 years and is co-author of the book Learn Ruby the Hard Way, which has been used by millions of students to learn the Ruby programming language. Prior to joining Varonis in 2011, Rob held a variety of roles in engineering, design, and professional services.

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